Port deregulation and productivity in Nigeria: Some implications for economic regulators

Abstract

Regulation in seaports broadly covers port safety, security, pollution and terminal operations which generally fall within the purview of national government’s administrative authority. Port deregulation policy in the era of global port reforms beginning in 1990’s, was introduced to limit government interference in commercial aspects of port operations, attract private sector funding and improve port productivity etc. However, in unregulated port market environment, the involvement of private sector in port terminal management can arguably generate risk of collusion especially among terminal operators offering the same or similar services. This paper examined port user welfare following private sector participation in a deregulated port environment. The Nigeria’s port terminal concession policy implementation was analysed as case study. From the findings, we demonstrated the essence for and role of economic regulator in ensuring that optimal port user welfare gains were achieved and maintained in post port reform regime.

Published
Apr 29, 2020
How to Cite
ONWUEGBUCHUNAM, Donatus Eberechukwu. Port deregulation and productivity in Nigeria: Some implications for economic regulators. Journal of Sustainable Development of Transport and Logistics, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 1, p. 133-140, apr. 2020. ISSN 2520-2979. Available at: <http://jsdtl.sciview.net/index.php/jsdtl/article/view/91>. Date accessed: 02 june 2020. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14254/jsdtl.2020.5-1.13.
Section
Articles